Sophie Jordan

All posts tagged Sophie Jordan

All the Ways to Ruin a Rogue review

Published July 29, 2015 by francesothomas

The heroine of Sophie Jordan’s All the Ways to Ruin a Rogue very nearly accomplishes this task when the book is scarcely underway. That is if implying that his, ahem, masculinity is somewhat lacking counts as ruin.

Aurelia has an unusual talent for drawing unflattering caricatures that she unleashes on Max. She’s in the throes of puppy love until she stumbles upon him in throes of another sort with a housemaid. The two have wasted no opportunity to snipe at each other for years since that incident.

Faced with the prospect of moving to a remote corner of Scotland, Aurelia decides it is time to acquire a husband. Her choices don’t sit well with Max. He says he’s only looking out for her since she is his best friend’s sister. Of course, the bickering has alerted us that he wants Aurelia for himself.

I’m not a fan of this book, I must confess. My tastes tend more toward witty repartee than in cutting remarks. I also felt there wasn’t much plot here.

This is the second book in the Debutante Files.

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KissCon launching on West Coast

Published October 23, 2014 by francesothomas

I often wish I lived on the West Coast. Now I have kiss two more reasons. Avon is launching new events called KissCon.

What does KissCon entail? A group of Avon authors will be doing a signing, a Q&A, and fun, interactive events with the audience. There will be prizes and raffles. Authors attending each event will vary slightly. Attendance is free, unless you spring for a VIP ticket—which gets you in to an exclusive reception with the authors, as well as one of the featured authors’ books.

Maybe I will finish one of my own romance novels in time to be featured at a Florida KissCon someday.  Anyway, here are the locations:

KissCon Seattle (at Copperfield’s Books in San Rafael, CA, Saturday, 11/22):

Avon Books and Copperfield’s San Rafael are joining forces to bring romance readers the very first KissCon (an Avon Affair!) on November 22, 2014.  There will be a special limited-attendance VIP event, and a larger public event.  We are encouraging readers to reserve tickets for both!

Featured authors include: Ilona Andrews, Elizabeth Boyle, Rachel Gibson, Laura Kaye, TJ Kline, Julie Anne Long, Sarah MacLean, Cathy Maxwell,Jennifer Ryan and Lori Wilde.

 

KissCon Seattle (at University Bookstore, Sunday, 11/23) :

Avon Books and University Book Store are teaming up to bring Seattle area romance readers the city’s first-ever multi-author KissCon (an Avon Affair!) on November 23, 2014.  There will be a special limited-attendance VIP event, followed by a larger public event.  We are encouraging readers to reserve tickets for both!

The star-studded author line-up includes: Ilona AndrewsJennifer BernardElizabeth BoyleJulie Brannagh, Rachel Gibson,  Lorraine HeathLaura KayeSophie Jordan, Sarah MacLeanCathy Maxwell, Darlene PanzeraJulia Quinn and Lori Wilde.

 

Historical fiction

Published August 27, 2012 by francesothomas

I just finished reading two books. Both could be termed historical novels, I suppose, but they are set in very different perioda and geographical places.

The first was Lessons from a Scandalous Bride by Sophie Jordan. This was an Avon romance set mostly in London in the Regency period. A bleak beginning establishes why Cleo, the heroine, has a distaste for the physical side of marriage and the possibility of childbirth. She is suddenly swept away to the ton by the father who had abandoned her and her mother. He provides a hefty dowry so she can marry into a title. She chooses a man so old that he can’t insist on husbandly rights. Of course, a virile Scots lord changes all that and love ensues.

The main character of the second book, The Chaperone by Laura Moriarty, has endured a sexless marriage not of her own doing. Cora goes to New York City in the early 1920s to find out about the mother who abandoned her to an orphanage while acting in loco parentis for silent movie-star-to-be Louise Brooks. Some of Louise’s flapper rebelliousness rubs off on Cora, and she too is able to find love in an unexpected way.

Moriarty has done her homework. Her book is well-researched and paints a vivid picture of what was like in the Roaring Twenties. But Cora doesn’t get a HEA. I’ll stick with regencies, thanks.